High Court ruling is threat to remaining homeopathy services, warns Faculty head

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 14917
    [post_author] => 1367
    [post_date] => 2018-07-17 08:54:50
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-17 07:54:50
    [post_content] => The Faculty of Homeopathy has criticised the High Court’s rejection of the British Homeopathic Association’s legal challenge to the 2017 NHS England consultation recommending GPs stop prescribing homeopathy.

In a blog post for the Society of Homeopaths, Faculty chief executive Greg White (pictured) said it was concerned that the decision would jeopardise the future of remaining services in England and limit the clinical freedom of members working in general practice.

“This poses a direct threat to the continuation of training of healthcare professionals in homeopathy and recruitment would therefore inevitably become much more problematic,” he said.

With healthcare professionals being denied the opportunity to practise homeopathy within the NHS, the Faculty had experienced trouble in attracting students to training courses, but it was stepping up its efforts to recruit from abroad, Greg added.

“This does not mean we are abandoning efforts to recruit in the UK. There is growing interest in a more integrative approach to healthcare from the medical professions and patients.

“Reports from Faculty members in private practice suggest there is increasing demand for their services, which is supported by surveys indicating more and more people are questioning the NHS’s over-reliance on pharmacological interventions and are turning to complementary medicine.

“Homeopathy is facing a challenging period, but the Faculty remains committed to supporting its members within the NHS to practise according to their skills and experience . . . while, at the same time, planning for a future when that may no longer be possible.”

Read Greg White's blog in full here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
    [post_title] => High Court ruling is threat to remaining homeopathy services, warns Faculty head
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => high-court-ruling-is-threat-to-remaining-homeopathy-services-warns-faculty-head
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-07-17 08:58:06
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-17 07:58:06
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://homeopathy.uk.w3pcloud.com/?p=14917
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)

The Faculty of Homeopathy has criticised the High Court’s rejection of the British Homeopathic Association’s legal challenge to the 2017 NHS England consultation recommending GPs stop prescribing homeopathy.

In a blog post for the Society of Homeopaths, Faculty chief executive Greg White (pictured) said it was concerned that the decision would jeopardise the future of remaining services in England and limit the clinical freedom of members working in general practice.

“This poses a direct threat to the continuation of training of healthcare professionals in homeopathy and recruitment would therefore inevitably become much more problematic,” he said.

With healthcare professionals being denied the opportunity to practise homeopathy within the NHS, the Faculty had experienced trouble in attracting students to training courses, but it was stepping up its efforts to recruit from abroad, Greg added.

“This does not mean we are abandoning efforts to recruit in the UK. There is growing interest in a more integrative approach to healthcare from the medical professions and patients.

“Reports from Faculty members in private practice suggest there is increasing demand for their services, which is supported by surveys indicating more and more people are questioning the NHS’s over-reliance on pharmacological interventions and are turning to complementary medicine.

“Homeopathy is facing a challenging period, but the Faculty remains committed to supporting its members within the NHS to practise according to their skills and experience . . . while, at the same time, planning for a future when that may no longer be possible.”

Read Greg White’s blog in full here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this page