Greg White: High Court decision leaves us bloodied but unbowed

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 14833
    [post_author] => 1367
    [post_date] => 2018-07-04 11:24:24
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-04 10:24:24
    [post_content] => The High Court has rejected the British Homeopathic Association’s legal challenge to the 2017 NHS England consultation that recommended GPs stop prescribing homeopathy. It is a serious blow to all who want to see wider access to the therapy.

As an organisation that represents healthcare professionals working within the health service, the Faculty of Homeopathy is concerned this decision will jeopardise the future of the remaining services in England and limit the clinical freedom of members working in general practice.

There is also the risk of a domino-effect from the judge’s ruling that could negatively influence events in Scotland. All of this poses a direct threat to the continuation of training of healthcare professionals in homeopathy and recruitment would, inevitably, become much more problematic.

Adapting to the future

Nevertheless, while not diminishing the impact of the High Court’s ruling, the Faculty has been taking steps to adapt to a future should NHS homeopathy no longer be available.

The long-term future of any registering body relies on its ability to recruit new members, and with healthcare professionals being denied the opportunity to practise homeopathy within the NHS, we have in recent years faced problems attracting students to our training courses.

However, the Faculty is an international organisation and we are therefore stepping up our efforts to recruit healthcare professionals from abroad. A major bonus we have in this endeavour is the worldwide regard in which the Faculty’s academic programme is held and we are confident this will help us to increase recruitment.

This does not mean we are abandoning efforts to recruit in the UK. Far from it!

There is growing interest in a more integrative approach to healthcare from the medical professions and patients. We feel there are many healthcare professionals who are disillusioned with the rigid medical paradigm being forced upon them by health bosses, which is highlighted by the difficulty the NHS is having in retaining highly-skilled staff and at considerable cost to the taxpayer.

It costs £230,000 to train a doctor (significantly more than the £94,412 annually the NHS was spending on homeopathic medicines in 2017: source NHS Digital), yet once qualified they are so disillusioned with the NHS they are leaving in droves.

Many of those leaving the health service are setting up in private practice where they can adopt a more holistic approach to treating patients. And reports from Faculty members in private practice suggest there is increasing demand for their services, which is supported by surveys indicating more and more people are questioning the NHS’s over-reliance on pharmacological interventions and are turning to complementary medicine.

Homeopathy is facing a challenging period, but the Faculty remains committed to supporting its members within the NHS to practise according to their skills and experience; while at the same time planning for a future when that may no longer be possible.

Next year the Faculty of Homeopathy celebrates its 175th anniversary. In its long history it has survived many turbulent periods – it will survive this one too.

Greg White, Chief Executive, Faculty of Homeopathy

Material published in this section of the website does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Society of Homeopaths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
    [post_title] => Greg White: High Court decision leaves us bloodied but unbowed
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => closed
    [ping_status] => closed
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => greg-white-high-court-decision-leaves-us-bloodied-but-unbowed
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-07-17 15:24:25
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-17 14:24:25
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://homeopathy-soh.org/?post_type=blogs&p=14833
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => blogs
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)

The High Court has rejected the British Homeopathic Association’s legal challenge to the 2017 NHS England consultation that recommended GPs stop prescribing homeopathy. It is a serious blow to all who want to see wider access to the therapy.

As an organisation that represents healthcare professionals working within the health service, the Faculty of Homeopathy is concerned this decision will jeopardise the future of the remaining services in England and limit the clinical freedom of members working in general practice.

There is also the risk of a domino-effect from the judge’s ruling that could negatively influence events in Scotland. All of this poses a direct threat to the continuation of training of healthcare professionals in homeopathy and recruitment would, inevitably, become much more problematic.

Adapting to the future

Nevertheless, while not diminishing the impact of the High Court’s ruling, the Faculty has been taking steps to adapt to a future should NHS homeopathy no longer be available.

The long-term future of any registering body relies on its ability to recruit new members, and with healthcare professionals being denied the opportunity to practise homeopathy within the NHS, we have in recent years faced problems attracting students to our training courses.

However, the Faculty is an international organisation and we are therefore stepping up our efforts to recruit healthcare professionals from abroad. A major bonus we have in this endeavour is the worldwide regard in which the Faculty’s academic programme is held and we are confident this will help us to increase recruitment.

This does not mean we are abandoning efforts to recruit in the UK. Far from it!

There is growing interest in a more integrative approach to healthcare from the medical professions and patients. We feel there are many healthcare professionals who are disillusioned with the rigid medical paradigm being forced upon them by health bosses, which is highlighted by the difficulty the NHS is having in retaining highly-skilled staff and at considerable cost to the taxpayer.

It costs £230,000 to train a doctor (significantly more than the £94,412 annually the NHS was spending on homeopathic medicines in 2017: source NHS Digital), yet once qualified they are so disillusioned with the NHS they are leaving in droves.

Many of those leaving the health service are setting up in private practice where they can adopt a more holistic approach to treating patients. And reports from Faculty members in private practice suggest there is increasing demand for their services, which is supported by surveys indicating more and more people are questioning the NHS’s over-reliance on pharmacological interventions and are turning to complementary medicine.

Homeopathy is facing a challenging period, but the Faculty remains committed to supporting its members within the NHS to practise according to their skills and experience; while at the same time planning for a future when that may no longer be possible.

Next year the Faculty of Homeopathy celebrates its 175th anniversary. In its long history it has survived many turbulent periods – it will survive this one too.

Greg White, Chief Executive, Faculty of Homeopathy

Material published in this section of the website does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Society of Homeopaths.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this page