Positive media on homeopathy welcomed after ‘years of negativity’

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    [post_date] => 2018-02-06 15:18:06
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    [post_content] => An article in a national newspaper outlining the benefits of homeopathy has been welcomed as a sign that more positive coverage of the field could be on the horizon.

The piece, ‘The case for homeopathy’ in the  Mail on Sunday highlighted the proposed NHS guidance to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) which may lead to homeopathy being removed from the list of remedies approved for prescription by GPs.

In it, GP Dr Michael Dixon, chair of the College of Medicine, was quoted as saying that the NHS move would leave to ‘tiny’ savings of around £92,000 a year. He also underlined that homeopathy plays a ‘complementary’ role to conventional medicine.

Businesswoman Jackie Cooper was also quoted in the article, detailing her experience of using homeopathic remedies after being diagnosed with the Epstein-Barr virus and urging people to sign the petition calling for a debate in Parliament on the NHS proposals.

The Society of Homeopaths has welcomed the article as a break with the negative media coverage of the field since around 2005.

“Media coverage of homeopathy before 2005 was mostly positive, like this article, and sometimes even enthusiastically supportive,” said Mark Taylor Society Chief Executive.“The attitude of the media was favourable and optimistic, encouraging the increasing role that homeopathy was playing in public healthcare. Homeopaths were working in GP surgeries, and mainstream medicine and science were accepting homeopathy.

“In the past few years, things have changed a great deal. Such positive media coverage and scientific acceptance has fallen away. Recent coverage has often been biased against homeopathy and there is a strong prejudice against it in scientific circles.”

Unfounded criticisms of homeopathy in the media could shape public opinion and consequently have an influence on policymakers’ decisions, he added.

“Homeopathy is surprising, but it is scientifically valid. There is plenty of good evidence that it works, and a possible explanation of how it works is emerging from new research on water.  It is a powerful system of medicine that should be playing an increasing role in our healthcare globally. Homeopaths demand that the media and government look again at the evidence and give homeopathy the support it rightfully deserves.”
    [post_title] => Positive media on homeopathy welcomed after ‘years of negativity’
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An article in a national newspaper outlining the benefits of homeopathy has been welcomed as a sign that more positive coverage of the field could be on the horizon.

The piece, ‘The case for homeopathy’ in the Mail on Sunday highlighted the proposed NHS guidance to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) which may lead to homeopathy being removed from the list of remedies approved for prescription by GPs.

In it, GP Dr Michael Dixon, chair of the College of Medicine, was quoted as saying that the NHS move would leave to ‘tiny’ savings of around £92,000 a year. He also underlined that homeopathy plays a ‘complementary’ role to conventional medicine.

Businesswoman Jackie Cooper was also quoted in the article, detailing her experience of using homeopathic remedies after being diagnosed with the Epstein-Barr virus and urging people to sign the petition calling for a debate in Parliament on the NHS proposals.

The Society of Homeopaths has welcomed the article as a break with the negative media coverage of the field since around 2005.

“Media coverage of homeopathy before 2005 was mostly positive, like this article, and sometimes even enthusiastically supportive,” said Mark Taylor Society Chief Executive.“The attitude of the media was favourable and optimistic, encouraging the increasing role that homeopathy was playing in public healthcare. Homeopaths were working in GP surgeries, and mainstream medicine and science were accepting homeopathy.

“In the past few years, things have changed a great deal. Such positive media coverage and scientific acceptance has fallen away. Recent coverage has often been biased against homeopathy and there is a strong prejudice against it in scientific circles.”

Unfounded criticisms of homeopathy in the media could shape public opinion and consequently have an influence on policymakers’ decisions, he added.

“Homeopathy is surprising, but it is scientifically valid. There is plenty of good evidence that it works, and a possible explanation of how it works is emerging from new research on water.  It is a powerful system of medicine that should be playing an increasing role in our healthcare globally. Homeopaths demand that the media and government look again at the evidence and give homeopathy the support it rightfully deserves.”

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