Conference: how acupuncture’s five elements can help shape approach to remedies

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 14063
    [post_author] => 1367
    [post_date] => 2018-03-27 11:10:30
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-03-27 10:10:30
    [post_content] => The tenets of acupuncture and how they can help inform a homeopathic approach to patients will be the subject of a workshop with Gabrielle Pinto at this year’s Society of Homeopaths annual conference.

Gabrielle, who trained as an acupuncturist before becoming a homeopath, will be explaining how she has integrated her understanding of the ‘five elements’ cycle of acupuncture into her homeopathy practice over 35 years. It will include a demonstration of her use of the 'fire' element to help in case analysis.

“I’m not teaching acupuncture but I’ll be showing how using the five elements that are its focus – fire, earth, metal, water and wood – can be a starting point for homeopaths,” she says. “It doesn’t mean I’m using needles. Rather, I’m going to discuss the initial observations you make when you first see a patient, how you can incorporate the five elements into an assessment, and how the thinking may influence the way you prescribe.”

In particular, the principles can offer a way into difficult ‘flat’ cases with few obvious symptoms, Gabrielle says.

“It’s the same as looking at tongue diagnosis – as a standalone technique it isn’t going to help you as a homeopath but tongue diagnosis integrated into your thinking and what it might mean helps to shape your decisions. But it does not mean you are moving away from classical homeopathy.”

It has since given her a useful extra perspective on patients who present with problems such as migraine, she adds.

“Having a broader vision helps me in my practice. It means that I can very quickly decide where I’m going with my remedies. I’ve got several tools in my box in terms of different ways of thinking.”

Gabrielle studied zoology at university and was introduced to acupuncture in the early 1970s when she discovered it was being explored by a neighbouring department of neurophysiology.

She has been a homeopath since 1984, taught at the University of Westminster as well as various colleges of homeopathy, and worked in the NHS at Marylebone health centre in London for several years.

“I’m very proud of the work we did there,” she says. “I was part of a great team, including acupuncturists and nutritionists, who saw patients and were doing research into the use of complementary therapies in primary care. One study showed we were driving down costs by about £20 a patient.”

The annual conference and AGM runs 28-29 April at the School of Pharmacy in London and offers a packed programme of speakers, interactive workshops, discussion panels and trade displays plus entertainment in the form of live jazz.

For more information and to book click here 
    [post_title] => Conference: how acupuncture's five elements can help shape approach to remedies
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => conference-how-acupunctures-five-elements-can-help-shape-approach-to-remedies
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-07-04 11:50:27
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-04 10:50:27
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://homeopathy.uk.w3pcloud.com/?p=14063
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)

The tenets of acupuncture and how they can help inform a homeopathic approach to patients will be the subject of a workshop with Gabrielle Pinto at this year’s Society of Homeopaths annual conference.

Gabrielle, who trained as an acupuncturist before becoming a homeopath, will be explaining how she has integrated her understanding of the ‘five elements’ cycle of acupuncture into her homeopathy practice over 35 years. It will include a demonstration of her use of the ‘fire’ element to help in case analysis.

“I’m not teaching acupuncture but I’ll be showing how using the five elements that are its focus – fire, earth, metal, water and wood – can be a starting point for homeopaths,” she says. “It doesn’t mean I’m using needles. Rather, I’m going to discuss the initial observations you make when you first see a patient, how you can incorporate the five elements into an assessment, and how the thinking may influence the way you prescribe.”

In particular, the principles can offer a way into difficult ‘flat’ cases with few obvious symptoms, Gabrielle says.

“It’s the same as looking at tongue diagnosis – as a standalone technique it isn’t going to help you as a homeopath but tongue diagnosis integrated into your thinking and what it might mean helps to shape your decisions. But it does not mean you are moving away from classical homeopathy.”

It has since given her a useful extra perspective on patients who present with problems such as migraine, she adds.

“Having a broader vision helps me in my practice. It means that I can very quickly decide where I’m going with my remedies. I’ve got several tools in my box in terms of different ways of thinking.”

Gabrielle studied zoology at university and was introduced to acupuncture in the early 1970s when she discovered it was being explored by a neighbouring department of neurophysiology.

She has been a homeopath since 1984, taught at the University of Westminster as well as various colleges of homeopathy, and worked in the NHS at Marylebone health centre in London for several years.

“I’m very proud of the work we did there,” she says. “I was part of a great team, including acupuncturists and nutritionists, who saw patients and were doing research into the use of complementary therapies in primary care. One study showed we were driving down costs by about £20 a patient.”

The annual conference and AGM runs 28-29 April at the School of Pharmacy in London and offers a packed programme of speakers, interactive workshops, discussion panels and trade displays plus entertainment in the form of live jazz.

For more information and to book click here 

Share this page