Spotlight on Iceland in latest edition of New Homeopath

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    [ID] => 15254
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    [post_date] => 2018-08-24 08:51:20
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    [post_content] => Perhaps now best known for its icy landscapes and gushing geysers, cutting-edge contemporary art and a football team that sent England home early from the last European Championships, Iceland has a proud but difficult history of homeopathy.

In a feature in the latest edition of the Society's New Homeopath journal, Guðný Ósk Diðriksdóttir, co-principal of the Iceland School of Homeopathy who runs a clinic in Reykjavik, describes how it was introduced to the country in 1850 – around a century before Iceland became an independent nation – by a wandering clergyman called Magnús Jónsson who spread his message across the land despite the lack of proper roads and bridges.

Meanwhile, missionary Arthur Charles Grook arrived from England in 1905 to preach around the country, accompanied by a medicine chest full of homeopathic remedies.

With relatively few medical doctors on the island, the practice flourished, and a law was eventually passed recognising homeopathy in 1911. This was, however, overturned in 1932 and homeopathy all but vanished from the island, robbing some people of the only healthcare they could afford.

In 1993, a small group of people – including grandchildren of those early pioneering practitioners – set out to restore its reputation and a course was established in collaboration with the College of Practical Homeopathy.

The Association of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Iceland was founded in 2000 and the Icelandic parliament passed legislation that allowed qualified homeopaths to practise legally five years later. Last year, the Iceland School of Homeopathy (ISH), was established.

Remedies are not easily available in Iceland, but some local ones have been developed.

They include Eyjafjallajökull which was made from the volcanic ash from the eruption in Holuhraun, the glacier in Eyjafjallajökull, in 2010 whose volcanic gases affected the health of local people.

Despite these advancements, however, homeopathy remains something of an unknown quantity in Iceland where little publicity is given to it and practitioners themselves are reluctant to run websites or newsletters because of a very vocal group of ‘detractors’.
    [post_title] => Spotlight on Iceland in latest edition of New Homeopath
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Perhaps now best known for its icy landscapes and gushing geysers, cutting-edge contemporary art and a football team that sent England home early from the last European Championships, Iceland has a proud but difficult history of homeopathy.

In a feature in the latest edition of the Society’s New Homeopath journal, Guðný Ósk Diðriksdóttir, co-principal of the Iceland School of Homeopathy who runs a clinic in Reykjavik, describes how it was introduced to the country in 1850 – around a century before Iceland became an independent nation – by a wandering clergyman called Magnús Jónsson who spread his message across the land despite the lack of proper roads and bridges.

Meanwhile, missionary Arthur Charles Grook arrived from England in 1905 to preach around the country, accompanied by a medicine chest full of homeopathic remedies.

With relatively few medical doctors on the island, the practice flourished, and a law was eventually passed recognising homeopathy in 1911. This was, however, overturned in 1932 and homeopathy all but vanished from the island, robbing some people of the only healthcare they could afford.

In 1993, a small group of people – including grandchildren of those early pioneering practitioners – set out to restore its reputation and a course was established in collaboration with the College of Practical Homeopathy.

The Association of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Iceland was founded in 2000 and the Icelandic parliament passed legislation that allowed qualified homeopaths to practise legally five years later. Last year, the Iceland School of Homeopathy (ISH), was established.

Remedies are not easily available in Iceland, but some local ones have been developed.

They include Eyjafjallajökull which was made from the volcanic ash from the eruption in Holuhraun, the glacier in Eyjafjallajökull, in 2010 whose volcanic gases affected the health of local people.

Despite these advancements, however, homeopathy remains something of an unknown quantity in Iceland where little publicity is given to it and practitioners themselves are reluctant to run websites or newsletters because of a very vocal group of ‘detractors’.

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