Plan to focus on prevention in health care ‘opens up a role for homeopathy’

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    [ID] => 15943
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    [post_date] => 2018-11-28 11:24:41
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    [post_content] => Homeopaths have given a cautious welcome to the latest move by government to encourage health professionals to put prevention at the heart of their work.

The new vision, set out in the document Prevention is better than cure, outlines the case and calls on NHS leaders, local authorities and individuals to make prevention a central tenet of their strategy and day-to-day work.

Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health, had signalled prevention would be one of the department’s key priorities under his leadership when he took over the role in summer 2018.

The document, while not a detailed or fully-costed strategy, gives some idea of what Hancock’s proposals will mean in reality.

It defines prevention as helping people to stay ‘happy, healthy and independent for as long as possible’ by reducing the chances of health problems arising and gives some indications of what this means in practice, including for people already living with health problems.

It also emphasises the need for a collective effort on prevention, by individuals, families, communities and employers, as well as the NHS and government.

Alison Fixsen, the Society’s research officer, said there was now clear interest in preventative care in NHS England and public health generally.

“The document is interesting in that mainstream health is now taking on board many of the ideas and philosophies that homeopathy has been advocating for much longer,” she said.

Suse Moebius, a member of the Society's research sub-committee, said mental health was an area where homeopathy had a good track record and could play a relevant part in prevention, if more widely used.

"This could include helping to reduce need for mainstream medications by keeping people well before specific mental health conditions - anxiety or depression for example - can develop, as well as in situations where mental outlook may be affected by another condition such as menopause."

It was encouraging to see mainstream health policy starting to embrace  a more holistic approach to healthcare and putting increasing emphasis on ‘wellness’ and prevention, she added.
    [post_title] => Plan to focus on prevention in health care 'opens up a role for homeopathy'
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Homeopaths have given a cautious welcome to the latest move by government to encourage health professionals to put prevention at the heart of their work.

The new vision, set out in the document Prevention is better than cure, outlines the case and calls on NHS leaders, local authorities and individuals to make prevention a central tenet of their strategy and day-to-day work.

Matt Hancock, Secretary of State for Health, had signalled prevention would be one of the department’s key priorities under his leadership when he took over the role in summer 2018.

The document, while not a detailed or fully-costed strategy, gives some idea of what Hancock’s proposals will mean in reality.

It defines prevention as helping people to stay ‘happy, healthy and independent for as long as possible’ by reducing the chances of health problems arising and gives some indications of what this means in practice, including for people already living with health problems.

It also emphasises the need for a collective effort on prevention, by individuals, families, communities and employers, as well as the NHS and government.

Alison Fixsen, the Society’s research officer, said there was now clear interest in preventative care in NHS England and public health generally.

“The document is interesting in that mainstream health is now taking on board many of the ideas and philosophies that homeopathy has been advocating for much longer,” she said.

Suse Moebius, a member of the Society’s research sub-committee, said mental health was an area where homeopathy had a good track record and could play a relevant part in prevention, if more widely used.

“This could include helping to reduce need for mainstream medications by keeping people well before specific mental health conditions – anxiety or depression for example – can develop, as well as in situations where mental outlook may be affected by another condition such as menopause.”

It was encouraging to see mainstream health policy starting to embrace  a more holistic approach to healthcare and putting increasing emphasis on ‘wellness’ and prevention, she added.

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