New Homeopath: Does profession need more ‘male energy’?

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    [post_content] => The gender imbalance among practitioners is threatening the ‘natural order’ of homeopathy and is failing patients, says a contributor to a forthcoming edition of the Society's New Homeopath magazine.

Ian Hamilton RSHom says in an article for the journal's winter issue that the disproportionate number of women practitioners means homeopathy’s ‘yin yang’ of male and female – and the male energy the profession needs – is missing.

“Balance is what we are seeking in our patients and with our cures, and yet the gender balance seems to be lacking,” he writes.

“What attracted men to homeopathy in the past is not there. Unless we can restore that balance in the profession at the grassroots, and maybe within the medical homeopaths as well – with more men retiring or moving on – homeopathy will suffer.”

Ian adds he noticed the number of male students dwindling and college classes becoming almost entirely composed of women during his time as an education adviser for the Society.

He believes there are many reasons homeopathy as a career choice for men has declined including the increased challenges of establishing a practice, the preponderance of training courses taking place in the affluent south-east and the rise of dissenter attacks.

“If I were starting out now, I would be very concerned about my career prospects as a homeopath from what I read in the press and media.

“I have no easy answers, but I pose questions which need to be acted on. Bring back the men or we are out of the natural order of things and we will fail our patients of both sexes.”

In a companion piece in the magazine, co-editor Sarah Lane says that the profession should celebrate the number of women drawn to homeopathy rather than worrying about the rise in number of female students.

“Women have embraced the opportunities of flexibility inherent in a homeopathic career more openly than men. Perhaps instead we need a marketing campaign aimed specifically at men that promotes how flexible work can benefit them too.”

Other stories in the issue include a report on the release after a seven-year delay of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) report in Australia which found 'encouraging evidence' for the effectiveness of homeopathy but which had been suppressed, an insight into homeopathy research in India and a celebration of the centenary of homeopathy advocate John Ainsworth by his granddaughter.

The winter issue of New Homeopath will be out in December. To subscribe to the journal which is published three times a year, click here
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The gender imbalance among practitioners is threatening the ‘natural order’ of homeopathy and is failing patients, says a contributor to a forthcoming edition of the Society’s New Homeopath magazine.

Ian Hamilton RSHom says in an article for the journal’s winter issue that the disproportionate number of women practitioners means homeopathy’s ‘yin yang’ of male and female – and the male energy the profession needs – is missing.

“Balance is what we are seeking in our patients and with our cures, and yet the gender balance seems to be lacking,” he writes.

“What attracted men to homeopathy in the past is not there. Unless we can restore that balance in the profession at the grassroots, and maybe within the medical homeopaths as well – with more men retiring or moving on – homeopathy will suffer.”

Ian adds he noticed the number of male students dwindling and college classes becoming almost entirely composed of women during his time as an education adviser for the Society.

He believes there are many reasons homeopathy as a career choice for men has declined including the increased challenges of establishing a practice, the preponderance of training courses taking place in the affluent south-east and the rise of dissenter attacks.

“If I were starting out now, I would be very concerned about my career prospects as a homeopath from what I read in the press and media.

“I have no easy answers, but I pose questions which need to be acted on. Bring back the men or we are out of the natural order of things and we will fail our patients of both sexes.”

In a companion piece in the magazine, co-editor Sarah Lane says that the profession should celebrate the number of women drawn to homeopathy rather than worrying about the rise in number of female students.

“Women have embraced the opportunities of flexibility inherent in a homeopathic career more openly than men. Perhaps instead we need a marketing campaign aimed specifically at men that promotes how flexible work can benefit them too.”

Other stories in the issue include a report on the release after a seven-year delay of the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) report in Australia which found ‘encouraging evidence’ for the effectiveness of homeopathy but which had been suppressed, an insight into homeopathy research in India and a celebration of the centenary of homeopathy advocate John Ainsworth by his granddaughter.

The winter issue of New Homeopath will be out in December. To subscribe to the journal which is published three times a year, click here

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