Society highlights benefits of homeopathy as alternative to antibiotics in fight against ‘superbugs’

WP_Post Object
(
    [ID] => 14783
    [post_author] => 1367
    [post_date] => 2018-07-02 11:28:17
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-07-02 10:28:17
    [post_content] => The Society of Homeopaths has submitted its views to a House of Commons inquiry set up to explore ways of tackling the ‘significant and increasing threat’ to public health posed by so-called ‘superbugs’ - bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs (AMR).

In its submission to the Commons Select Committee on Health and Social Care, the Society has said it considers that homeopathy - along with increased public awareness and other non-drug therapies - can positively contribute to AMR reduction through appropriate and less antibiotic use.

“With a growing body of clinical evidence, a strong safety record and evidence of cost-effectiveness, homeopathy represents one potential therapeutic solution that could lead to a reduction in the use of antibiotics,” it said.

“Advantages of homeopathy include ease of application and safety, with few contraindications existing in the treatment of the very young and old, beside the careful selection of remedy and dosage.”

A holistic medical approach, such as that frequently used in homeopathy, may offer therapeutic advantages over other methods, it adds.

“A body of research exists which supports the view that homeopathy could be at least as effective as a standard treatment, has effects which can be arguably differentiated from placebo, can lead to reduced conventional drug use and can fill effectiveness gaps in conventional medical treatment.

“This is particularly the case for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and their complications, including acute otitis media (AOM).”

The Society’s response also drew on research findings including a study by Haidvogl et al which showed individual homeopathic treatment in children to be not only as effective for acute URTIs as conventional care, but to be associated with significantly faster onset of improvement in the first week.

In a further study by Trichard et al, which compared homeopathic and antibiotic treatment strategies for rhino pharyngitis in children, homeopathy yielded significantly better results than antibiotics in terms of both medical effectiveness and improved quality of life with significantly less time taken off work for parents.

According to the inquiry background papers, data indicates that AMR is responsible for 700,000 deaths a year worldwide and at least 50,000 in the US and Europe. The death toll could reach 10m people a year by 2050 if the rise in resistance is not headed off, it is estimated.

Submissions to the committee's inquiry closed at the end of June and it will report back later in the year.

The Government’s next antimicrobial resistance (AMR) strategy will be published at the end of the year.

Society of Homeopaths' members can view the Society's submission in the members area of this website under Campaigns.
    [post_title] => Society highlights benefits of homeopathy as alternative to antibiotics in fight against 'superbugs'
    [post_excerpt] => 
    [post_status] => publish
    [comment_status] => open
    [ping_status] => open
    [post_password] => 
    [post_name] => society-highlights-benefits-of-homeopathy-as-alternative-to-antibiotics-in-fight-against-superbugs
    [to_ping] => 
    [pinged] => 
    [post_modified] => 2018-07-04 11:29:41
    [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-04 10:29:41
    [post_content_filtered] => 
    [post_parent] => 0
    [guid] => https://homeopathy.uk.w3pcloud.com/?p=14783
    [menu_order] => 0
    [post_type] => post
    [post_mime_type] => 
    [comment_count] => 0
    [filter] => raw
)

The Society of Homeopaths has submitted its views to a House of Commons inquiry set up to explore ways of tackling the ‘significant and increasing threat’ to public health posed by so-called ‘superbugs’ – bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs (AMR).

In its submission to the Commons Select Committee on Health and Social Care, the Society has said it considers that homeopathy – along with increased public awareness and other non-drug therapies – can positively contribute to AMR reduction through appropriate and less antibiotic use.

“With a growing body of clinical evidence, a strong safety record and evidence of cost-effectiveness, homeopathy represents one potential therapeutic solution that could lead to a reduction in the use of antibiotics,” it said.

“Advantages of homeopathy include ease of application and safety, with few contraindications existing in the treatment of the very young and old, beside the careful selection of remedy and dosage.”

A holistic medical approach, such as that frequently used in homeopathy, may offer therapeutic advantages over other methods, it adds.

“A body of research exists which supports the view that homeopathy could be at least as effective as a standard treatment, has effects which can be arguably differentiated from placebo, can lead to reduced conventional drug use and can fill effectiveness gaps in conventional medical treatment.

“This is particularly the case for acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) and their complications, including acute otitis media (AOM).”

The Society’s response also drew on research findings including a study by Haidvogl et al which showed individual homeopathic treatment in children to be not only as effective for acute URTIs as conventional care, but to be associated with significantly faster onset of improvement in the first week.

In a further study by Trichard et al, which compared homeopathic and antibiotic treatment strategies for rhino pharyngitis in children, homeopathy yielded significantly better results than antibiotics in terms of both medical effectiveness and improved quality of life with significantly less time taken off work for parents.

According to the inquiry background papers, data indicates that AMR is responsible for 700,000 deaths a year worldwide and at least 50,000 in the US and Europe. The death toll could reach 10m people a year by 2050 if the rise in resistance is not headed off, it is estimated.

Submissions to the committee’s inquiry closed at the end of June and it will report back later in the year.

The Government’s next antimicrobial resistance (AMR) strategy will be published at the end of the year.

Society of Homeopaths’ members can view the Society’s submission in the members area of this website under Campaigns.

Share this page