Society appeals for evidence for inquiry into ‘superbugs’

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    [ID] => 14681
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    [post_date] => 2018-06-15 09:59:12
    [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-15 08:59:12
    [post_content] => Homeopaths are being urged to contribute to an inquiry exploring ways to tackle a looming public health crisis threatened by 'superbugs' - bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.

The Commons Select Committee on Health and Social Care is inviting evidence for its investigation into the progress made by the government so far in responding to the challenge.

The two angles it is exploring are:
  • What results have been delivered by the current UK strategy on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), launched in 2013?
  • Key actions and priorities for the government’s next AMR strategy, due to be published at the end of 2018.
The Society of Homeopaths is putting together a submission and is asking members to submit their own evidence to the inquiry of using homeopathic alternatives to antimicrobials. According to the inquiry background papers, antimicrobial resistance - in which bacteria have evolved into 'superbugs',  resistant to drugs devised to kill them - is a "significant and increasing threat" to public health in the UK and globally. EU data indicates that it is responsible for 700,000 deaths a year worldwide and at least 50,000 in the US and Europe. The death toll could reach 10m people a year by 2050 if the rise in resistance is not headed off, it is estimated. Society Chief Executive Mark Taylor said: "Our members know a great deal about the alternatives to antibiotics through their own practice and knowledge. This is a timely inquiry from the Health and Social Care Committee to assess the success of the existing strategy and an opportunity to make the case again for fresh thinking on this pressing public health challenge." View the inquiry details here The closing date for submissions to the committee is June 29. [post_title] => Society appeals for evidence for inquiry into 'superbugs' [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => society-appeals-for-evidence-for-inquiry-into-superbugs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-07-04 11:36:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-07-04 10:36:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://homeopathy.uk.w3pcloud.com/?p=14681 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw )

Homeopaths are being urged to contribute to an inquiry exploring ways to tackle a looming public health crisis threatened by ‘superbugs’ – bacteria resistant to antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs.

The Commons Select Committee on Health and Social Care is inviting evidence for its investigation into the progress made by the government so far in responding to the challenge.

The two angles it is exploring are:

  • What results have been delivered by the current UK strategy on antimicrobial resistance (AMR), launched in 2013?
  • Key actions and priorities for the government’s next AMR strategy, due to be published at the end of 2018.

The Society of Homeopaths is putting together a submission and is asking members to submit their own evidence to the inquiry of using homeopathic alternatives to antimicrobials.

According to the inquiry background papers, antimicrobial resistance – in which bacteria have evolved into ‘superbugs’,  resistant to drugs devised to kill them – is a “significant and increasing threat” to public health in the UK and globally. EU data indicates that it is responsible for 700,000 deaths a year worldwide and at least 50,000 in the US and Europe.

The death toll could reach 10m people a year by 2050 if the rise in resistance is not headed off, it is estimated.

Society Chief Executive Mark Taylor said: “Our members know a great deal about the alternatives to antibiotics through their own practice and knowledge. This is a timely inquiry from the Health and Social Care Committee to assess the success of the existing strategy and an opportunity to make the case again for fresh thinking on this pressing public health challenge.”

View the inquiry details here

The closing date for submissions to the committee is June 29.

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