NHS: Prescriptions ‘ban’ on homeopathy to go ahead

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    [ID] => 13185
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    [post_date] => 2017-12-07 11:51:39
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    [post_content] => NHS England is to go ahead with its recommendation to remove homeopathy from the list of items available on prescription.
Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), which issue guidance to GPs, will be told by NHS bosses that homeopathy should no longer be prescribed for patients, including those who currently receive it.
NHS England announced the move following a four-month public consultation on new guidelines on prescriptions, drawn up to help reduce the £9.2 billion annual NHS prescriptions bill. Homeopathy prescriptions account for just £92,000 of prescriptions each year, according to NHS figures.
The 18 items earmarked for removal alongside homeopathy include herbal remedies and glucosamine, plus medications such as paracetamol-tramadol in combination and some travel vaccines.
The move to de-list homeopathy was heavily criticised by bodies including the Society of Homeopaths and the British Homeopathic Association (BHA), which is leading a campaign for a judicial review of the consultation process.
Reacting to the latest development, the BHA said in a statement on its website that NHS England’s decision was “disappointing but not unexpected” as the process was itself fundamentally flawed.
In a video published on the BHA Facebook page, Cristal Sumner, BHA Chief Executive, said the association would press on with its campaign for a judicial review.
“We need to make sure that government organisations are held accountable for the kind of decisions they are making,” she said, adding that the decision to remove homeopathy from prescription would have a “very sad knock-on effect for people who can ill-afford homeopathic care privately and can ill-afford for their health not to see a homeopath.”
Mark Taylor, Chief Executive of the Society of Homeopaths, said: “Our original argument still stands: the consultation process was flawed and it seems unjust for NHS England to press ahead until the case for a judicial review has been heard.”
    [post_title] => NHS: Prescriptions 'ban' on homeopathy to go ahead
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NHS England is to go ahead with its recommendation to remove homeopathy from the list of items available on prescription.
Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), which issue guidance to GPs, will be told by NHS bosses that homeopathy should no longer be prescribed for patients, including those who currently receive it.
NHS England announced the move following a four-month public consultation on new guidelines on prescriptions, drawn up to help reduce the £9.2 billion annual NHS prescriptions bill. Homeopathy prescriptions account for just £92,000 of prescriptions each year, according to NHS figures.
The 18 items earmarked for removal alongside homeopathy include herbal remedies and glucosamine, plus medications such as paracetamol-tramadol in combination and some travel vaccines.
The move to de-list homeopathy was heavily criticised by bodies including the Society of Homeopaths and the British Homeopathic Association (BHA), which is leading a campaign for a judicial review of the consultation process.
Reacting to the latest development, the BHA said in a statement on its website that NHS England’s decision was “disappointing but not unexpected” as the process was itself fundamentally flawed.
In a video published on the BHA Facebook page, Cristal Sumner, BHA Chief Executive, said the association would press on with its campaign for a judicial review.
“We need to make sure that government organisations are held accountable for the kind of decisions they are making,” she said, adding that the decision to remove homeopathy from prescription would have a “very sad knock-on effect for people who can ill-afford homeopathic care privately and can ill-afford for their health not to see a homeopath.”
Mark Taylor, Chief Executive of the Society of Homeopaths, said: “Our original argument still stands: the consultation process was flawed and it seems unjust for NHS England to press ahead until the case for a judicial review has been heard.”

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