College move to sustainable model ‘will avoid burn-out’

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    [post_date] => 2019-08-29 09:03:58
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    [post_content] => Ahead of the new academic year, Emma Cox of the North West College of Homeopathy has shared the experience of rethinking their business model to put the college on a more sustainable footing and avoid staff 'burn-out'.

Writing in the Society's New Homeopath journal, she explains how, when its sale was proposed 11 years ago, the college in Stockport chose to become a social enterprise, designed to revolutionise homeopathic education and give it a long-term future.

A new board was appointed with a flat management system ensuring the business drew on a wealth of experience, knowledge and time from several people, as opposed to just one person, says Emma, a college director and head of philosophy and repertory.

“If the college was run in a more hierarchical way, the possibility of one individual reaching burn out would be much higher," she writes. "By dividing the work, the running of the college becomes significantly more manageable. We are able to match the best people we have available with the most suitable tasks, streamlining and improving the quality of our work.”

Sustainability is the theme of the summer issue of New Homeopath, which also includes features on the Travelling Homoeopaths Collective plus features by Mani Norland, principal of the School of Homeopathy, and Professor Aaron To Ka Lun, president of the Hong Kong and Macau homeopathy associations. Find out how to subscribe here
    [post_title] => College move to sustainable model 'will avoid burn-out'
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Ahead of the new academic year, Emma Cox of the North West College of Homeopathy has shared the experience of rethinking their business model to put the college on a more sustainable footing and avoid staff ‘burn-out’.

Writing in the Society’s New Homeopath journal, she explains how, when its sale was proposed 11 years ago, the college in Stockport chose to become a social enterprise, designed to revolutionise homeopathic education and give it a long-term future.

A new board was appointed with a flat management system ensuring the business drew on a wealth of experience, knowledge and time from several people, as opposed to just one person, says Emma, a college director and head of philosophy and repertory.

“If the college was run in a more hierarchical way, the possibility of one individual reaching burn out would be much higher,” she writes. “By dividing the work, the running of the college becomes significantly more manageable. We are able to match the best people we have available with the most suitable tasks, streamlining and improving the quality of our work.”

Sustainability is the theme of the summer issue of New Homeopath, which also includes features on the Travelling Homoeopaths Collective plus features by Mani Norland, principal of the School of Homeopathy, and Professor Aaron To Ka Lun, president of the Hong Kong and Macau homeopathy associations. Find out how to subscribe here

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