British Homeopathic Association puts case for judicial review of NHS consultation

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    [post_date] => 2017-11-14 15:01:34
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    [post_content] => The British Homeopathic Association (BHA) is stepping up its campaign to force a Government re-think on the move to prevent GPs prescribing homeopathic remedies.

In a Facebook Live video, chief executive Cristal Sumner set out the case for a judicial review of the plans outlined in the NHS England consultation document Items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care. 

The document features draft guidance for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), including recommendations that doctors should not prescribe homeopathic items to new patients and should cease prescribing them for existing ones.

Ms Sumner said a judicial review was the only means of challenging the government in a way that would make ministers listen, adding that the campaign was not just about homeopathy but about the wider issue of ‘patient choice’.

“We have so much to offer in complementary and alternative medicine to the NHS which is struggling with multiple areas,” she said, adding that it was “clear” that patients wanted a choice of homeopathy, herbal medicines and a more natural way of approaching health.

Although 1.1bn items were prescribed by doctors at a cost of £9.2billion in 2016-17, homeopathic remedies accounted for just £92,412 of the total, according to NHS figures.

The BHA, together with the Society of Homeopaths and other groups under the 4homeopathy umbrella, has argued that the consultation process was flawed on the basis that no homeopaths or experts in the field were part of it and that the outcome appears to be ‘pre-determined’.

The BHA has launched a crowdfunding campaign, aiming to raise £16,000 to help cover the costs of the legal action. The Society of Homeopaths has pledged £5,000 towards it.

Meanwhile, a BHA petition to stop NHS England from removing herbal and homeopathic medicines has received more than 21,000 signatures since it was launched in September 2017. If 100,000 people sign then the petition must be debated in Parliament.

The NHS consultation closed at the end of October. A summary of the responses will be published on the NHS England website and the NHS England board will consider all responses and evidence received at the end of this month (November 2017) to produce a final version of its guidance to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).
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The British Homeopathic Association (BHA) is stepping up its campaign to force a Government re-think on the move to prevent GPs prescribing homeopathic remedies.

In a Facebook Live video, chief executive Cristal Sumner set out the case for a judicial review of the plans outlined in the NHS England consultation document Items which should not be routinely prescribed in primary care. 

The document features draft guidance for clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), including recommendations that doctors should not prescribe homeopathic items to new patients and should cease prescribing them for existing ones.

Ms Sumner said a judicial review was the only means of challenging the government in a way that would make ministers listen, adding that the campaign was not just about homeopathy but about the wider issue of ‘patient choice’.

“We have so much to offer in complementary and alternative medicine to the NHS which is struggling with multiple areas,” she said, adding that it was “clear” that patients wanted a choice of homeopathy, herbal medicines and a more natural way of approaching health.

Although 1.1bn items were prescribed by doctors at a cost of £9.2billion in 2016-17, homeopathic remedies accounted for just £92,412 of the total, according to NHS figures.

The BHA, together with the Society of Homeopaths and other groups under the 4homeopathy umbrella, has argued that the consultation process was flawed on the basis that no homeopaths or experts in the field were part of it and that the outcome appears to be ‘pre-determined’.

The BHA has launched a crowdfunding campaign, aiming to raise £16,000 to help cover the costs of the legal action. The Society of Homeopaths has pledged £5,000 towards it.

Meanwhile, a BHA petition to stop NHS England from removing herbal and homeopathic medicines has received more than 21,000 signatures since it was launched in September 2017. If 100,000 people sign then the petition must be debated in Parliament.

The NHS consultation closed at the end of October. A summary of the responses will be published on the NHS England website and the NHS England board will consider all responses and evidence received at the end of this month (November 2017) to produce a final version of its guidance to clinical commissioning groups (CCGs).

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