Faculty of Homeopathy congress buzzes with energy, passion and debate – just like ours

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    [post_content] => Last weekend Mark Taylor, the Society’s Chief Executive, attended the Faculty of Homeopathy congress in Liverpool.  Here, he reflects on the event and on the contrasts with the Society’s own conference.

To the outsider, there is a bewildering range of homeopaths and homeopath organisations, sliced and diced in so many ways: statutory regulation, style of homeopath, whether you treat humans or animals or good old-fashioned tribal loyalties.

The Faculty of Homeopathy is principally an organisation for doctors who practise homeopathy and people have never been slow to tell me that they are very different from ‘ordinary’ homeopaths and describe, in detail, the enmities that existed between the two sides as little as five years ago.

So, I assumed that a trip to their conference, to Planet Faculty, would prove to be a very different experience from Planet Society and, in particular, to our annual conference. Surely I would be entering a world where there were lots of people I did not know talking about issues I didn’t recognise.

Well, actually, no.

There was much about the event that I recognised and many people that I was familiar with, from Society members, friends of the Society, 4Homeopathy colleagues, Society board members, suppliers and even people I work with.

In addition, the content was not dissimilar to a Society conference with plenty of discussion and debate about remedies, prescribing, Hahnemann and The Organon.  Though, oddly, I came across little in the programme about the most pressing issue for Faculty members: the end of NHS prescribing.

The delegates were unfailingly cheerful and welcoming even though the event was held under the shadow of the tragic death of their President, Peter Fisher.  To their credit they paid proper respect to him and his achievements and then resolved to move on positively in a way that he would have wanted.

So, what were the differences between the two events? Theirs is longer and more expensive.  It lasted over 3 days and cost an eye-watering £385 - way out of reach of the average Society member.

For the first time they included homeopathic vets and they had a high quotient of foreign speakers and delegates. It was hotel-based and a fancy one at that; none of the bare practicalities of a hall of residence here.

And the food was better.

The social highlight was a very grand gala dinner which was a great success but, again, would have been beyond our members’ budgets.

Yet, despite all this, I felt the same buzz of passion, energy and debate that we have at our conference.  The speakers were inspiring and committed and the networking intensive and enthusiastic.

Perhaps we live on the same planet after all?

Material published in this section of the website does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Society of Homeopaths.
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Last weekend Mark Taylor, the Society’s Chief Executive, attended the Faculty of Homeopathy congress in Liverpool.  Here, he reflects on the event and on the contrasts with the Society’s own conference.

To the outsider, there is a bewildering range of homeopaths and homeopath organisations, sliced and diced in so many ways: statutory regulation, style of homeopath, whether you treat humans or animals or good old-fashioned tribal loyalties.

The Faculty of Homeopathy is principally an organisation for doctors who practise homeopathy and people have never been slow to tell me that they are very different from ‘ordinary’ homeopaths and describe, in detail, the enmities that existed between the two sides as little as five years ago.

So, I assumed that a trip to their conference, to Planet Faculty, would prove to be a very different experience from Planet Society and, in particular, to our annual conference. Surely I would be entering a world where there were lots of people I did not know talking about issues I didn’t recognise.

Well, actually, no.

There was much about the event that I recognised and many people that I was familiar with, from Society members, friends of the Society, 4Homeopathy colleagues, Society board members, suppliers and even people I work with.

In addition, the content was not dissimilar to a Society conference with plenty of discussion and debate about remedies, prescribing, Hahnemann and The Organon.  Though, oddly, I came across little in the programme about the most pressing issue for Faculty members: the end of NHS prescribing.

The delegates were unfailingly cheerful and welcoming even though the event was held under the shadow of the tragic death of their President, Peter Fisher.  To their credit they paid proper respect to him and his achievements and then resolved to move on positively in a way that he would have wanted.

So, what were the differences between the two events? Theirs is longer and more expensive.  It lasted over 3 days and cost an eye-watering £385 – way out of reach of the average Society member.

For the first time they included homeopathic vets and they had a high quotient of foreign speakers and delegates. It was hotel-based and a fancy one at that; none of the bare practicalities of a hall of residence here.

And the food was better.

The social highlight was a very grand gala dinner which was a great success but, again, would have been beyond our members’ budgets.

Yet, despite all this, I felt the same buzz of passion, energy and debate that we have at our conference.  The speakers were inspiring and committed and the networking intensive and enthusiastic.

Perhaps we live on the same planet after all?

Material published in this section of the website does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Society of Homeopaths.

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